Little Walter's Equipment

Alles was man sonst noch braucht:

Mikros, Amps, Soft- und Hardware zum Aufnehmen und Abspielen...

Moderatoren: DocBen, harpX, Pimpinella

Antworten
Juke
Beiträge: 1899
Registriert: 24.04.2014, 08:36
Wohnort: die Metropole im südlichen Ostwestfalen

Little Walter's Equipment

Beitrag von Juke » 10.06.2019, 10:47

In der - wie ich bereits an anderer Stelle schrieb - sehr lesenswerten Little-Walter-Biografie* las ich jetzt etwas über die von Little Walter benutzte Elektrik.
Little Walter spielte 1954 häufig im Club "Magnolia" in Atlanta/Georgia. Zu seinen Konzerten kam mehrmals in der Woche über mehrere Monate ein etwa 15-jähriger Junge, der LW im Radio gehört hatte und von seinem Spiel begeistert war. Er beschreibt Verstärker und Mikro wie folgt:
... a National amplifier ... it had a two-speaker set-up, one speaker went way on one side of the stage, and the one on the right side of the stage had the control knobs on it. He had two microphones [ wand mikes ] that were taped together with adhesive tape. He put one plug in one side of that amplifier, and one plug in the other side, and he'd mess with his tones - it got quite a sound.
Vielleicht können unsere Experten sich mal dazu äußern. Wenn ich das richtig verstehe, hat LW wohl kein Bullet-Mikro sondern zwei zusammen geklebte Stabmikrofone (Gesangsmikros?) gespielt, die er an zwei (?) Verstärker angeschlossen hatte - oder an einen Verstärker mit zwei Eingängen und einer zweiten Lautsprecherbox.

Schöne Grüße
Dirk


* "Blues with a Feeling - the Little Walter Story" von Tony Glover, Scott Dirks und Ward Gaines
Damn, this shit is Deep 8)

Und in Bezug auf neues Zeugs (Harps, Amps, Mikros, Effekte usw.) wusste bereits Schiller: Der Wahn ist kurz, die Reu ist lang.

madhans
Beiträge: 2464
Registriert: 16.03.2009, 20:41
Wohnort: Zentralbayern
Kontaktdaten:

Re: Little Walter's Equipment

Beitrag von madhans » 10.06.2019, 13:36

Hi!
Das kann man vielleicht auf unterschiedliche Arten deuten, aber ich sehe es eher als einen Beweis dafür, dass man damals wenig Möglichkeiten hatte und auch wenig Einblick in die Technik.
Und trotzdem kam Sound raus, dem wir nacheifern.

Gruß CB

drstrange
Beiträge: 1274
Registriert: 09.12.2011, 10:01
Wohnort: swabian outback Stromberg Heuchelberg
Kontaktdaten:

Re: Little Walter's Equipment

Beitrag von drstrange » 11.06.2019, 04:36

Wenn man wüßte welcher National Amp das war, wäre man schlauer.

Nach kurzem Googeln fand ich den folgenden interessanten Artikel:

https://alt.music.harmonica.narkive.com ... alter-tone

Und der bestätigte mir, was ich anderswo schon las:
Ebenso wie Jimi Hendrix, scheinen die wirklich guten Leute
aus jedem Equipment was rausholen zu können und zeigen uns mit unserer
HW-Korinthenkackerei, was wirklich wichtig ist. Nämlich spielen zu können.
Aber lest selbst:

[........]

David H. wrote: Little Walter supposedly used a Masco amp that the
Sonny Jr. is based on. He also apparently used a Danelectro Commando
that Gary (Sonny JR's manufacturer) has offering for sale. He also
reportedly used: a tweed Bassman, a Premier amp, a National amp, and
probably lots of others. They all are most likely good amps.

"Supposedly" is the key word here. I've talked to literally dozens of
people who saw Little Walter play, played with him, recorded with him,
and were around him, and not a single person has EVER been able to say
for sure *exactly* what amp he used at any time in his career.
People have given descriptions - "it was an amp with a lot of speakers
in it" or "it had separate speakers that came away from the amp" - but
most of the amps he's supposed to have used are just the amps that
people have been able to find that most closely fit the descriptions
they've heard.
No one I've ever spoken to about it - and I've talked to a LOT of people
about this over the last 20 years or so - seems to know any real details
like which amp was used on which recording session, etc.

The best info I've ever got in all of my searching is this: A harp
player in Atlanta who says that when he was 16, he saw Little Walter
play at a big theater, has said that Little Walter was using a Premier
amp on stage.
Little Walter's former guitarist Dave Myers says he thought LW was using
a "Macon" PA system to play through. And Louis Myers, Dave's brother who
also played with LW in the '50s, said LW played through an
"International" amp that had two separate speaker cabinets with several
small speakers in each cabinet.

The "Macon" PA system Dave spoke of was probably a Masco, and the
"International" amp MAY have been a National, but I've gone through
Stacks of old National catalogs from the '50s and '60s and never found a
National amp that matches this description. The assumption that LW used
a Danelectro Commando is based only on the fact that it is a guitar amp
that closely matches the description Louis gave.

BTW, I think it's interesting to note that although the Tweed Bassman
seems to the amp of choice for harp players today who are going for the
"Little Walter sound", I've never come across any evidence or even a
suggestion that he ever used one.

It's also wroth pointing out that there wasn't really a specific Little
Walter sound - if you listen to his recordings in chronological order,
you discover that the amplified sound changed with almost every session
he did. Sometimes it was really harsh and distorted like on "Rocker",
other times it was relatively clean. It sounds to my ear like he may
have had a different amp with him each time he went into the studio, so
to try and pin his 'sound' on any one amp is futile.

What I do know is that he went through a LOT of different amps. He
apparently didn't take very good care of his equipment, blew out a lot
of amps, and would replace them with something new whenever he had a
problem that couldn't be easily fixed. Jimmy Lee Robinson, who played
with him for 4 years in the '50s, said that LW would play through
literally anything that was available, and didn't seem to have a
preference or a favorite amp.

In fact, he said that when he played gigs around town, he never even
brought an amp with him - he would just play and sing through the PA.
(Remember that most inexpensive PA systems at that time would have been
good harp rigs - an Astatic mic and a low powered tube amp with a couple
of extension speakers were fairly standard.) And on sessions he would
sometimes use whatever amp was at the studio. So basically, whatever
WORKED and was loud enough was good enough for him.
Scott
P.S. I played a gig through a borrowed Sonny Jr. last night, and I have
to say it's one of the best sounding, most player sensitive harp amps
I've ever come across. Definitely the best new amp available for harp by
a long shot.

[......]

Podunk Phill 14 years ago
Permalink Little Walter's Effects

Mainly echo and/or reverb. The recordings Little Walter made as a leader are
somewhat more heavily effects-laden than his work accompanying Muddy Waters
and others, but there is echo/reverb present to some degree on almost every
session after 1951. At the earliest sessions, this would have necessarily
originated from the studio - there were no outboard units or amps with
built-in reverb yet available.

A lot of research has been conducted (by Scott Dirks and others) into Chess
Records' early recording techniques, and as a result we now have a clearer
picture of how these recordings were produced, In response to a recent
request for info, Scott filled me in with the following details:

"Contrary to popular belief, most of the classic Chess blues sides weren't
recorded at Chess Studios, which didn't come into being until around 1955.

Universal Studios was the premiere recording studio in Chicago for years,
and to his credit, Leonard Chess used Universal exclusively until his own
studio was up and running.

"Universal owner/chief engineer Bill Putnam built his own tape delay machine
using a reel-to-reel....(and they basically) used three different methods to
get delay and/or reverb: (1) An empty tiled room with a speaker at one end
and a mic at the other (the classic 'echo chamber,*) (2) a massive plate
reverb unit, and (3) the slave reel-to-reel that was used solely for tape
delay."

At least one harmonica book has stated that Little Walter used an Echoplex,
an outboard unit made up of an endless tape-loop cartridge. That book goes
so far as to say that the Echoplex can be clearly heard on "Juke," "Mean Old
World," "Sad Hours," etc. Problem with that analysis is that the Echoplex
wasn't yet invented or available (nor were it's predecessors the EccoFonic
or EchoSonic) in 1952 when those songs were recorded. The effect we're
hearing on them is no doubt the aforementioned reel-to-reel device built by
Putnam.

Nevertheless, the Echoplex is a handy unit for today's harp player. If
you're in the market for one, keep in mind there are two versions: the
earlier tube variety and the later solid-state model. Some folks claim
there's little difference; to my ears, though, the more fragile tube model
is richer sounding. The "echo" aspect may not be that much different, but
when used with a high-gain instrument (like harp through a mic,) the tube
unit breaks up into a warmer distortion. Unfortunately in today's market,
the vintage tube model commands more than twice the price of the solid-state
version.

###################################################################
This is an excerpt from a book by Tom Ball called Sourcebook of Little
Walter/Big Walter Licks for Blues Harmonica

###################################################################

https://www.google.com/search?client=sa ... 8&oe=UTF-8
Gruß
drstrange
Happy wife -> happy life.

traditional

munkamonka
Beiträge: 3054
Registriert: 03.09.2005, 14:18
Wohnort: berlin
Kontaktdaten:

Re: Little Walter's Equipment

Beitrag von munkamonka » 11.06.2019, 08:40

Ja, der Sound kommt vom Spieler, und so. Trotzdem wollen die meisten möglichst gutes Equipment spielen.

Aber was speziell LW betrifft: Ich finde nicht, dass es DEN LW-Sound gibt.
Okay, vielleicht der: Viel Verzerrung und Echo. Weil das sind die Features, die er, wenn nicht erfunden, zumindest populär gemacht hat.
Aber er hat m.E. in so ziemlich jeder Aufnahme einen anderen Sound, mal sehr verzerrt, mal kaum, mal mit viel Echo, mal akustisch, alles ist dabei.

Jetzt also konkret ein Set-up nachzuempfinden macht nicht nur deshalb keinen Sinn, weil man nicht wie der Meister selbst spielen kann (ich zumindest nicht), sondern weil das nur zu EINEM LW Sound passen wird.

Noch ein paar Gedanken: Ich finde Mcros haben eine sehr hohe Bandbreite an Sound-Ergebnis, selbst bei gleichem Produkt. Und Lautstärke spielt auch eine wesentliche Rolle, ich denke, heute wäre man mit dem durchschnittlichen Output von damals nicht mehr wirklich zufrieden. Wenn man das Setup nicht bei der gleichen Lautstärke betreibt, klingt es einfach ganz anders. Nicht in jedem Fall übertragbar.

Gruß
m

PS: den langen englischen Text hab ich noch nicht gelesen, kann sein dass sich da was überschneidet
... meiner meinung nach

triona
Beiträge: 1455
Registriert: 21.09.2014, 18:56
Wohnort: Aue
Kontaktdaten:

Re: Little Walter's Equipment

Beitrag von triona » 11.06.2019, 09:27

drstrange hat geschrieben:
11.06.2019, 04:36
... bestätigte mir, was ich anderswo schon las:
Ebenso wie Jimi Hendrix, scheinen die wirklich guten Leute
aus jedem Equipment was rausholen zu können und zeigen uns mit unserer
HW-Korinthenkackerei, was wirklich wichtig ist. Nämlich spielen zu können.
und
munkamonka hat geschrieben:
11.06.2019, 08:40
Ja, der Sound kommt vom Spieler, und so.

Ohne daß ich jetzt den langen Text gelesen hätte:
Den Verdacht hatte ich schon länger.


liebe Grüße
triona
Dess daacht doch alles nischt, dess naimodisch Zaich.
frei nach Anton Günther

Ich hab nur einmal ganz kurz auf die Maus geklickt - ich glaub ich hab das Internet gelöscht.

Meine Nachbarn hören Mundharmonika - ob sie wollen oder nicht.

harp-addicted
Beiträge: 641
Registriert: 24.05.2013, 20:03
Wohnort: München
Kontaktdaten:

Re: Little Walter's Equipment

Beitrag von harp-addicted » 11.06.2019, 09:30

Bei dem Amp mit den 2 Lautsprechern dürfte es sich wohl um den
Danelectro Commando https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dO5XrfQ4A88 handeln.
Ich meine auch mal ein Foto mit LW damit gesehen zu haben.

Zum Bühnensound kenne ich nur die Live-Aufnahme mit Otis Rush https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9thDlztnXQ,
fürchterliche Qualität und auch da akustisch gespielt, wie beim American F+B Festival.

drstrange
Beiträge: 1274
Registriert: 09.12.2011, 10:01
Wohnort: swabian outback Stromberg Heuchelberg
Kontaktdaten:

Re: Little Walter's Equipment

Beitrag von drstrange » 11.06.2019, 10:03

munkamonka hat geschrieben:
11.06.2019, 08:40

PS: den langen englischen Text hab ich noch nicht gelesen, kann sein dass sich da was überschneidet
Jo iss so.

drstrange
Happy wife -> happy life.

traditional

madhans
Beiträge: 2464
Registriert: 16.03.2009, 20:41
Wohnort: Zentralbayern
Kontaktdaten:

Re: Little Walter's Equipment

Beitrag von madhans » 11.06.2019, 15:03

Mann,
die wären alle froh gewesen, wenn sie einen powermate gehabt hätten. Röhren ... ihr seid von gestern :-)Der "neueste Scheiß" ist cool!

Ich hab mir in letzter Zeit ein Sammlung an russischen und deutschen preampröhren angelegt. Nicht weil es notwendig ist, aber seit ich den Kay habe .... Wahnsinn, was die Leute damals aus NIX gemacht haben. Also technisch.

Gruß
CB

munkamonka
Beiträge: 3054
Registriert: 03.09.2005, 14:18
Wohnort: berlin
Kontaktdaten:

Re: Little Walter's Equipment

Beitrag von munkamonka » 11.06.2019, 15:58

drstrange hat geschrieben:
11.06.2019, 10:03
munkamonka hat geschrieben:
11.06.2019, 08:40

PS: den langen englischen Text hab ich noch nicht gelesen, kann sein dass sich da was überschneidet
Jo iss so.

drstrange
okay, habs überflogen. Ja, überrascht mich gar nicht. das mit den vielen verschiedenen amps, usw.
außerdem, es gibt ja nicht nur LW, wenn es um Chicago geht. Ich find das Intro von mean Mistreater (Johnny Winter, mit Walter Horton) sehr cool, aber auch den Quäk von George Smith in Telephone Blues genauso gut. Usw. Sind alle anders. Aber das, was wir als 'authentisch' bezeichnen würden.

erlaubt ist, was gefällt. kein Dogma!
... meiner meinung nach

Juke
Beiträge: 1899
Registriert: 24.04.2014, 08:36
Wohnort: die Metropole im südlichen Ostwestfalen

Re: Little Walter's Equipment

Beitrag von Juke » 11.06.2019, 17:12

Ziel erreicht - wir haben mal wieder eine Diskussion. Und nebenbei einen coolen Amp (Danelectro Commando) kennen gelernt. :-D
Es stimmt schon, LW hat bei nahezu jeder Aufnahmesession einen anderen Sound. Das wird einem besonders deutlich, wenn man die Aufnahmen in chronologischer Reihenfolge Session für Session hört. Innerhalb einer Aufnahmesession hat LW oft den selben Ton (wenn er nicht zwischen elektrischem und akustischem Spiel wechselt ;) ).

Das von Boris zitierte Buch habe ich auch - allerdings bereits vor ein paar Jahren gelesen. Muss ich also nochmal rausholen. Nach der Biografie. ;)

Schöne Grüße
Dirk
Damn, this shit is Deep 8)

Und in Bezug auf neues Zeugs (Harps, Amps, Mikros, Effekte usw.) wusste bereits Schiller: Der Wahn ist kurz, die Reu ist lang.

Adam_Lark
Beiträge: 543
Registriert: 22.12.2014, 22:23
Wohnort: Mühlheim am Main

Re: Little Walter's Equipment

Beitrag von Adam_Lark » 11.06.2019, 19:56

Es gibt schon so was wie den LW Sound, oder Ton, oder eher Style, unabhängig vom Equipment.
Ich habe schon vergleichende Aufnahmen verschiedener Amps und auch Mics gepostet. Fazit: Die Unterschiede waren viel geringer, als wenn ich mit Dingen wie Cupping oder Harp an der Wange gespielt habe. Sprich: Ich habe den Eindruck, es wird viel mehr dem Equipment hinterher gerannt als den Spieltechniken, dabei machen die viel mehr aus. Ausser vielleicht bei der Pucker/TB Diskussion, aber da gibts wiederum nichts zu diskutieren, finde ich.

Gruß
Blues will never die...

Juke
Beiträge: 1899
Registriert: 24.04.2014, 08:36
Wohnort: die Metropole im südlichen Ostwestfalen

Re: Little Walter's Equipment

Beitrag von Juke » 04.08.2019, 16:46

Im Urlaub bin ich dazu gekommen, das im ersten Post von mir zitierte Buch weiter zu lesen (bin aber noch nicht ganz durch).

In einem späteren Kapitel wird geschrieben, dass LW ständig andere Verstärker hatte und oft auch mit seinem Mikro - in der Regel ein Bullet mit Kristallelement - direkt in die PA gespielt hat. Und seine Amps sollen in der Regel eher klein gewesen sein, und eher mit mehreren kleinen Lautsprechern.

Es war also bei LW schon so wie bei uns heute: Man ist immer auf der Suche nach dem idealen Gerät, dass laut genug ist, einen geilen Sound hat, sich im Bandgefüge durchsetzen kann und dabei möglichst klein und leicht ist, damit man es auch auf kleinen Bühnen unterkriegt und problemlos mitnehmen kann.

In jedem Fall ist das Buch eine äußerst spannende Lektüre, in der man u.a. auch sehr viel über die einzelnen Aufnahmesessions erfährt und in dem sich viele Leute äußern, die mit LW gespielt haben - auf Tour und im Studio. Die Autoren scheinen auch Zugang zu den (noch erhaltenen) Bändern der Aufnahmesessions gehabt zu haben, da teils die Gespräche wiedergegeben werden, die während der Takes den Weg mit aufs Band fanden. Da ist manches wirklich witzige dabei, wenn Leonard Chess z.B ganz aufgeregt reagiert: "You can't say that, Walter, you can't say 'My pants are coming down!'" und Walter trocken antwortet: "It's 'My pains is coming down!'" und daraufhin alles in Lachen ausbricht ...

Schöne Grüße
Dirk
Damn, this shit is Deep 8)

Und in Bezug auf neues Zeugs (Harps, Amps, Mikros, Effekte usw.) wusste bereits Schiller: Der Wahn ist kurz, die Reu ist lang.

Antworten